Teaching

Teaching with the CEA

The Cambridge Online Encyclopedia of Anthropology is a growing open-access teaching and learning resource that can be used for preparing the International Baccalaureate (IB). It brings together comprehensive overviews of anthropological thought organised by topics. These topics provide opportunities to draw concepts and areas of inquiry into conversation with one another, as is encouraged by the IB syllabus guide. Each entry covers a topic and can help teachers in selecting further readings, or in identifying broader anthropological debates.

The following table helps teachers locate encyclopaedia entries that are most relevant to their needs. It lists CEA entries based on their relevance to the IB syllabus ‘groups' and 'areas of inquiry’. It also lists ‘key concepts’ that teachers might want to cover. The fourth column lists the subheadings used within the encyclopaedia entry, to provide teachers with a sense of the content that each entry covers. The table was put together in October of 2020 and will be updated annually.

Areas of Inquiry Encyclopaedia Entry Key Concepts Entry Subheadings
Group 1
Classifying the World Animals

Symbolism

Belief and Knowledge

Social Relations

Power

Good to eat, good to think

Good to live with

Taking animism seriously

From trust to domination?

Taking animals (and scientists) seriously

Conclusion: multispecies multiethnography

Islam

Belief and Knowledge

Power

Change

Is there an anthropology of Islam?

Where is Islam?

Everyday ethics and exceptional politics

Humans and God

Women and men

Reform and critique

Science

Belief and Knowledge

Culture

Materiality

A science of non-science?

From Science to sciences

Studying scientists in their labs: two examples

Three key lessons

Health and Illness Autism

Change

Social Relations

Belief and Knowledge

Disciplinary landscapes

The emergence of autism

Autism's ontological status

Self-advocacy and the neurodiversity movement

Identity, community, and subjectivity

Language and sociality

Body and senses

Autism around the world

Global Health

Belief and Knowledge

Culture

Change

Introduction: an awkward relation

Emergent transformations in global health

Anthropological engagements with global health

Disability

Power

Social Relations

Society

Introduction: disability and difference, disability and impairment

From a medical to a social model

Stigma, liminality, and reconciling the exceptional with the ordinary

Beyond the Euro-American west

Recent developments

The Body Death

Social Relations

Change

Belief and Knowledge

Hertz: death as transformation

The transformation of death

Death and contemporary biomedicine

New immortalities

Thanato-politics

Afterword/afterlife

Queer Anthropology

Identity

Culture

Change

Power

History

Queer anthropology

From homosexual to Tom: language, categories, meanings

The transgender turn

Queer, American style

Is gay global?

Sport

Materiality

Identity

Change

Culture

Sport in anthropology

The emergence of modern sport

Sport under capitalism and socialism

The neoliberal restructuring of sport

Sport, gender, and sex

Sport as cultural performance

Body enhancement and its limits

Conclusion: sport and scale

Group 2
Belonging Citizenship

Identity

Power

Change

Social Relations

Society

The political community

Anthropological approaches: (i) citizenship as subject formation

Anthropological approaches: (ii) where are our political communities?

Anthropological approaches: (iii) membership and exclusion

Taking a fresh look at citizenship

Further reading

House and Home

Materiality

Symbolism

Social Relations

Society

The house: from symbolism to social reproduction

Assembling home: materialist approaches

Re-making home: feminist and critical approaches

Home as a process and ideal

Childhood

Social Relations

Power

Change

Belief and Knowledge

Introduction: children and ‘childhood’

Socialization: becoming a cultural person

Knowledge and learning

Formal schooling and new models of childhood

Problematising child rights

The politics of childhood

Ethics / Morality

Society

Social Relations

Change

Identity

Partial engagements: Durkheimian, Boasian, and Marxist

New departures: The anthropology of ethics

Intellectual traditions

Emerging debates

Communication, Expression and Technology Digital Anthropology

Change

Materiality

Social Relations

What is ‘the digital’?

Some newish worlds

Everyday digital life

How we do anthropology digitally

Changing humanity

Voice

Materiality

Power

Identity

Voice in Euro-American modernity

The sonic and material voice

Voice and the making of socio-political identity

The voice as excess

Sound technologies and the mediated voice

Public voices and intimate publics

Conclusion: The wider relevance of voice

Movement, Time and Space Anthropocene

Change

Materiality

Power

What is the Anthropocene?

The Anthropocene as context

Studying ‘the Anthropocene’ as a concept

Remaking the Anthropocene: speculation, creativity, and experimentation

Re-politicising the Anthropocene

Landscape

Materiality

Symbolism

Landscape in the social sciences

Anthropological beginnings: ‘space’

Rethinking ‘landscape’

The anthropology of landscape

‘Landscape’ in a changing world

Tourism

Social Relations

Power

Change

Introduction: contexts and contradictions

Tourism as ritual: directly experiencing a macrocosm

Staging, commodification, and spectatorship

Host-guest interdependence and the creation of new social systems

Conclusion: the psychological complexity of images of others

Group 3
Conflict Resistance

Change

Power

Society

Identity

Order and rebellion: resistance in the shadows

From order to conflict: Marxist and post-colonial anthropology

Culture, identity and symbolism: everyday resistance

Too much resistance: power and subjectivity

Imagining different futures: contemporary anthropological approaches to resistance

Revolution

Change

Power

Defining revolution

A field takes shape

Placing revolutions in wider social contexts

Paradoxes and contradictions within revolutions

Legacies of revolution

Anthropologies of revolutions

Precarity

Change

Power

Society

Materiality

Precarity

The ontological condition of precariousness

Precarity as part of neoliberal capitalism

The ‘Precariat’ and class formation

Conclusion: the politics of labour

Development Charity

Change

Power

Identity

Knowledge and Belief

Materiality

Theoretical foundations

Reciprocity versus mutuality

Research on charity pre-2000

Decentring of charity via Islam

The critique of humanitarianism

A holistic template

Conclusion: progress in charity?

Human Rights

Identity

Power

Change

Society

Anti anti-relativism

Enter the activists

Intimate human rights

Mining

Change

Power

Materiality

Social Relations

The lives of miners

Mine-affected communities and mining encounters

Buying and selling minerals

The ethics of studying mining

Conclusion: future directions

Production, Exchange, Consumption Feasting

Materiality

Society

Power

Change

The cultural nature of feasting

Function versus foundation

Eating and not eating

Risky, anti-social feasts

Morality and politics under negotiation

Production before the feast

Invisible guests with power over life and death

Money

Materiality

Power

Change

Symbolism

What counts as money?

Money at the threshold of persons and relations

Monetary pluralism

Networks, platforms and open questions

Waste

Materiality

Change

Society

Symbolism

Symbolic-structuralist approaches

Economic-materialist approaches

Intersubjective and post-human

Water

Materiality

Identity

Symbolism

Power

Religion, health and wealth

Power and control

Infrastructure and conflict

Owning water

Water in the Anthropocene

Teaching with individual entries

Teachers can find a series of entry-specific teaching suggestions below

Animals

Citizenship

Digital Anthropology

Human Rights

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